Editors’ introduction

Authors

  • Nicoleta Corbu National University of Politcal Studies and Public Administration
  • Peter Maurer Norwegian University of Science and Technology
  • Agnieszka Stępińska Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.19195/1899-5101.12.2(23).1

Author Biographies

Nicoleta Corbu, National University of Politcal Studies and Public Administration

Nicoleta Corbu is a professor at the College of Communication and Public Relations, SNSPA, Romania. She currently coordinates, as an executive director, the Center for Research in Communication. She holds a PhD diploma in sociology; she is the recipient of a Fulbright grant in the United States (University of Georgia, 2008–2009), and was visiting professor at Florida Gulf Coast University (2012). She has been a member of the Network of European Political Communication Scholars (NEPOCS) since 2018. She was member of the Management Committee of the COST Action IS1308 “Populist Political Communication in Europe: Comprehending the Challenge of Mediated Political Populism for Democratic Politics,” and “Journalistic Role Performance Around the Globe.”

Peter Maurer, Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Peter Maurer is a postdoctoral fellow in political communication at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim. He has a doctorate from the Faculty of Social Sciences at Freie Universität Berlin (2011) and was an affiliated member of the COST Action IS1308 “Populist Political Communication in Europe: Comprehending the Challenge of Mediated Political Populism for Democratic Politics.” His research interests include political communication and political journalism in a comparative perspective.

Agnieszka Stępińska, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań

Agnieszka Stępińska is a professor at the Faculty of Political Science and Journalism at the Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland. Her main area of research is political communication. She has been also conducting studies on journalism and media content. She participated in several international research projects, including Foreign News on TV, the COST Action IS1308 “Populist Political Communication in Europe: Comprehending the Challenge of Mediated Political Populism for Democratic Politics,” and “Journalistic Role Performance Around the Globe.”

References

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Published

2019-07-23

How to Cite

Corbu, N., Maurer, P., & Stępińska, A. (2019). Editors’ introduction. Central European Journal of Communication, 12(2(23), 130-133. https://doi.org/10.19195/1899-5101.12.2(23).1

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